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Humanities

 

 

 

What Do You Study in Humanities Courses?

Humanities courses at BCC explore ways of thinking, being, and living in a global, transnational and interdisciplinary perspective by guiding student learning in an historically grounded and critically engaged approach to a variety of subjects. Comprising disciplines concerned with human thought, creativity, and experience, courses in the Humanities allow students to study foundations in personal and community values, cultural views, religious beliefs, and aesthetic practices and theories.

BCC’s Humanities Program includes introductory courses in the field as well as courses following specific threads in both Film Studies and in the study of Religion and Philosophy.

Film Studies at BCC

 

Faculty

                    (click on names for faculty websites)

♦   Shawn Doubiago, Ph.D. (sdoubiago@peralta.edu)

♦   Dylan Eret, Ph.D.   (deret@peralta.edu)

♦   Jose Martin, M.A. (jmartin@peralta.edu)

♦   Michelle Mueller, M.A. (mmueller@peralta.edu)

♦   Laura E. Ruberto, Ph.D. (lruberto@peralta.edu)

♦   Joanne Taylor, Ph.D. (jmtaylor@peralta.edu)

♦   Jonathan Haynes (jehaynes@peralta.edu)

♦   Elizabeth Wing-Paz, Ph.D.  (ewing-paz@peralta.edu)

 

 

Humanities Course Descriptions

(Source: 2013-2015 Berkeley City College Catalog)

HUMAN 1, 3 Units

Introduction to Humanities

3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Humanities seen through various forms of expression: The arts and society, such as dance, painting, music, sculpture, and mythology; theory and practice in artistic creation to stimulate personal awareness.

 

HUMAN 5, 3 Units

Storytelling in American Culture

3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Storytelling among different ethnic groups within the United States: How collective memories are selected, organized, transformed, contested, and retold as origin myths, multicultural histories, family lore, heroic epics, trickster tales, traumatic experiences, slave narratives, immigrant testimonies, spectacular events, war memorials, celebrity biographies, urban legends, animated fairy-tales, or science fiction films.

 

HUMAN 21, 3 Units

Film: Art and Communication

3 hours lecture (GR). Also offered as ART 98 and ENGL 21. Not open for credit to students who have completed or are currently enrolled In ART 98 or ENGL 21. Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Analysis of history and aesthetics of film from its inception in the late nineteenth century to the present: Language of film, factual films vs. fictional films, and effect of films on contemporary society.

 

HUMAN 26, 4 Units

Global Cinema

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Global cinema analyzed through historical, political, commercial, cultural, and artistic perspectives: Screenings and interpretation of representative films from a variety of national film traditions outside of the United States, including films from Iran, India, Italy, France, Russia, Japan, China, Brazil, and Argentina.

 

HUMAN 30A, 3 Units

Human Values/Ethics

3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP)

Also offered as PHIL 31A. Not open for credit to students who have completed or are currently enrolled in PHIL 31A. Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Analysis of concepts of good and right in our society and of criteria of conduct: Various religious, philosophic, scientific, and aesthetic aspects of moral behavior integrated with reason and emotion of the individual.

 

HUMAN 30B, 3 Units

Human Values/Aesthetics

3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Analysis of the nature of the beautiful as expressed in visual arts, music, and literature of Western and other cultures: Integration of various aspects of daily and transitory activities of the individual to permanent, recorded expressions of the human spirit through the use of major works of art.

 

HUMAN 40, 3 Units

Religions of the World

3 hours lecture (GR). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Comparative study of the world’s great religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; original sources stressed.

 

HUMAN 46, 3 Units

Philosophy of the Human Experience

3 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Also offered as PHIL 46. Not open for credit to students who have completed or are currently enrolled in PHIL 46. Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Perennial philosophical and religious questions central to the human experience: Overview of diverse religious teachings, as well as critical investigation of philosophical perspectives regarding the nature of the self, experience, and purpose.

 

HUMAN 48UA-ZZ, .5-5 Units

Selected Topics in Humanities

0-5 hours lecture, 0-15 hours laboratory (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: CSU

See section on Selected Topics.

 

HUMAN 49, .5-5 Units

Independent Study in Humanities

0-5 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: CSU

See section on Independent Study.

 

HUMAN 52, 4 Units

Women and Cinema

4 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Recommended preparation: HUMAN 21 or an introduction to Film Studies course. Also offered as WS 52. Not open for credit to students who have completed or are currently enrolled in WS 52. Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Analysis of women in cinema and of feminist and queer film criticism: Feminist film theory, criticism, and history; women as readers of film; women’s independent film; women’s often conflicted relationship with film representations; and the role of sexuality and gender in film viewing and representation.

 

HUMAN 53, 4 Units

Comparative Film Genres

4 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Recommended preparation: HUMAN 21 or an introduction to Film Studies course. Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Survey of film genres selected from two to four of the following: Film noir, action, comedy, romance, western, musical, horror, documentary, gangster, and others.

 

HUMAN 55, 4 Units

The Representation of Immigration in Cinema and Television

4 hours lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Survey of immigration and cinema: Divergent ways immigrants and immigration have been represented in U.S. cinema and television, historical and contemporary examples in relation to the history of U.S. immigration policies, and public debate about immigration. Focus is on the U.S., but other cinematic narratives of immigration may be studied for purposes of comparison.

 

HUMAN 56, 1 Unit

Meditation: Theory and Practice

1 hour lecture (GR or P/NP). Acceptable for credit: CSU

Introduction to theory and practice of a variety of meditation methods: Contemporary and ancient techniques; comparative studies from monastic and householder traditions, both Eastern and Western.

 

HUMAN 182, 3 Units

Introduction To Visual Culture

3 Hours Lecture (GR/PNP). Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU

Not open for credit to students who have completed or are currently enrolled in ART 182.

Introduction to the function of visual languages from “high” art to TV, movies, and popular culture: Key concepts such as power, identity, ideology, gender, race, class, globalism, desire, consumerism and their impact on the production and understanding of the visual; role of the viewer in the ongoing and co-creative establishment of meaning.

 

HUMAN 226, 1 Unit

Global Cinema (Screening)

3 hours lab (P/NP).

Screenings of representative films from a variety of national film traditions outside of the United States, including films from Iran, India, Italy, France, Russia, Japan, China, Brazil, and Argentina.

 

(Source: 2013-2015 Berkeley City College Catalog)

  • Arts and Cultural Studies

    Thursday 23 October 2014

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